Negligent Employee

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    There is no federal law that obligates employers to adopt or follow any specific disciplinary process. In the vast majority of states, the default rule is that employment is at will, which means that the employer or the employee can terminate the employment relationship at any time and for any reason (or no reason) unless a law or agreement...

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    When employee anger turns to violence... "Steve's come back. He's in the lobby and he's acting strange. He's very angry," Kim whispered on the phone just before the line went silent. Kim, the HR director, had to act NOW. What would you do if an ex-employee stormed into your office with a gun? Does your organization have a policy in place to deal...
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    California's Fourth Appellate District recently ruled that an employer's liability under the doctrine of negligent entrustment (knowingly entrusting a dangerous item to someone likely to use it and pose an unreasonable risk of harm to others) depends on the employee being specifically determined to be negligent (failing to act with...
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    When is your company on the hook for employees' negligence? In a significant ruling for Kansas employers, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (which has jurisdiction in Kansas) applied a new standard not previously recognized by Kansas courts for determining employer liability for injuries caused by employees...
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    Even though Florida employers provide workers' compensation benefits, employees may sue their companies, their supervisors, and even co-workers for injuries arising from intentional torts (or personal injuries). An injured employee may sue a managerial or supervisory employee if that person's conduct rises to the level of "culpable...
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    One of your employees is driving her personal vehicle during the workday. She runs a stop sign and hits another car. Can you be held liable for her negligence? In some cases, the answer is clearly yes. If she was on company business at the time of the accident, you can be forced to pay for the damages caused by her negligence. But...
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    The New Jersey Appellate Division has held that an employer is liable for its employee's negligence when traveling home from work if the employee is required to have a vehicle available for work responsibilities. The doctrine of respondeat superior means that an employer is liable for the negligent acts of its employees...
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    If you have employees who use their personal vehicles for your business' benefit, you create the risk of liability if an accident occurs. With today's widespread use of cell phones, talking and driving by your employees while on the job could set off a powder keg of tragic consequences and large damage payments. Thus, it is...
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    If you have employees who use their personal vehicles for your business' benefit, you create the risk of liability if an accident occurs. With today's widespread use of cell phones, talking and driving by your employees while on the job could set off a powder keg of tragic consequences and large damage payments. Thus, it is...
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    If you have employees who use their personal vehicles for your business' benefit, you create the risk of liability if an accident occurs. With today's widespread use of cell phones, talking and driving by your employees while on the job could set off a powder keg of tragic consequences and large damage payments. Thus, it is...
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